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August 27, 2021

EPISODE 32: Drive More Traffic to Your Amazon Listing

SS_Ep32.jpg

In This Episode

This week's podcast guest is Andrew Maff, the Founder & CEO of BlueTuskr a full-service marketing company for e-commerce sellers. His expertise is in helping e-commerce sellers diversify and scale their businesses. Andrew shares strategies to get your product on Amazon page one and keep it there.

TRANSCRIPT

Tommy Beringer:

What's up, you data-hungry Amazon sellers? This is your host Tommy Beringer of the Sell Rank Win podcast from MerchantWords. And in this podcast, we give you the answers to your most burning questions, actionable insights that you can take away and implement into your business today. So, let's go ahead and dive right into today's episode. What do you say? Let's go.

What's going on, everybody? Welcome to the Sell Rank Win podcast. I'm your host, Tommy Beringer. And as always, we have a very special guest on with us today. He has 15 years of experience in the e-commerce industry and has been helping e-commerce sellers diversify their business for over seven years. He's also the founder and CEO of Bluetuskr, which is a full service marketing company for e-commerce sellers. Without further ado, it is my pleasure to introduce you to Andrew Maff. How are you doing, Andrew?

Andrew Maff:

Doing good. How are you doing?

Tommy Beringer:

I'm good, brother. I'm good. I'm good. I'm glad-.

Andrew Maff:

I loved that. That was like I just got invited into WrestleMania or something. That was awesome.

Tommy Beringer:

You know, right?

Andrew Maff:

Appreciate that.

Tommy Beringer:

Yeah. The ringmaster over here trying to make it happen. What's his name again? The announcer, the famous announcer?

Andrew Maff:

Oh, the ready to rumble guy?

Tommy Beringer:

Yeah.

Andrew Maff:

I don't know it off the top of my head. I'm not even going to try.

Tommy Beringer:

Yeah, yeah. Anyways, anyways. But yeah, I should have started it out with, "Let's get ready to rumble." That would've been funny. Maybe on my next podcast I'll do that.

Andrew Maff:

Nice.

Tommy Beringer:

Yeah, me and Andrew were just chopping it up about a little bit of a fantasy, the secret that we listened to on SiriusXM, which is... Should we let the fantasy people know out there the channel-

Andrew Maff:

No.

Tommy Beringer:

... that they need to listen to? No? We're not doing it?

Andrew Maff:

How are we going to win?

Tommy Beringer:

We're keeping our secret? I'm sure they could Google it and figure it out anyway.

Andrew Maff:

I don't know.

Tommy Beringer:

All right. I know, right? How am I going to win? Anyways, I think every single guy in my league listens to the same damn show. But anyways, where are you at in the world, Andrew?

Andrew Maff:

I'm in Westchester, Pennsylvania. So, I'm basically just outside Philadelphia.

Tommy Beringer:

Awesome. Cool, man. Cool. Cool. All right, well, what do you say? You want to dive in?

Andrew Maff:

Let's do it.

Tommy Beringer:

Let's do it. Okay. So, I want to know, how did you make your way into the digital marketing space way back 15, 16, some years ago?

Andrew Maff:

Oh, wow. Okay. So, when I started my father owned a e-commerce company. He sold car shocks and they bought this company that was real small and he grew it into this massive multi-million dollar company. He needed help in the warehouse and I said, "Fine, but I've known since I was a kid that I wanted to get into marketing." So, I was like, "I'll help you out in the warehouse. But I also want just some kind of of insight into the marketing side." So, that's pretty much where it started as basically an intern for my father. And I would help out on some email marketing, things like that back then. Then as time went on, I was in the music industry for a while. I was in a band and we all had our own role outside of obviously playing an instrument.

And so I was in charge of promoting our shows and booking our stuff. And basically long story short, I ended up starting a company where I booked all of the concerts in pretty much most of central Florida. And so tours would come through and I would end up being the one promoting them and stuff. And then after a while, I started to hate it because it was just the music industry is horrible, but the venues would ask me to help them promote stuff. And then every now and then they would have just a night where they were just doing a party or something, and so I basically ended up getting into hospitality and doing marketing there. Then as time went on there, ended up merging the company that I had created, which was basically at that point now an agency, with a family member who was doing something relatively similar, but more on a retail brick and mortar side.

So, we merged that company. I ended up exiting that one because working with family is always awesome. And then I went in-house to a couple places trying to change it up a little bit. And then I just really enjoy the agency life of just being able to... I really like helping other businesses and I really like changing up what I do every day. So, then I, about five or six years ago, started an agency with a partner of mine. We ended up selling that in September of 2019 to a public company. And then in January 2020, I left and started Bluetuskr and now I'm here.

Tommy Beringer:

Very cool. Very cool. That's awesome. So, helping Pops out with the shocks. My dad, he was a mechanic and I would be at his shop and I would help him out sometimes, too. So, it's always fun helping out Pops, right?

Andrew Maff:

Yeah.

Tommy Beringer:

And then another thing that I did not know as we're getting to know each other here, is you were in the music industry. I was in the music industry too, and we both made a total 180 here. So, we got to go grab a beer sometime here one of these days.

Andrew Maff:

Yes, Absolutely.

Tommy Beringer:

It feels like it. Cool, man.

Andrew Maff:

Were you a musician?

Tommy Beringer:

Producer, songwriter. And it was just up and down all the time. So, just had to change it up and do something else.

Andrew Maff:

Oh, I'm the exact opposite. I was a drummer. So, I can't write music. I can't read music. I literally just come in and make as much frigging noise as I possibly can.

Tommy Beringer:

Yeah. I-

Andrew Maff:

Producers, man. That's an art.

Tommy Beringer:

Yeah. I mean, I didn't read music either. I just had a partner who was able to do that, but I just played by ear and then just moved on that way. But I mean, this is a whole nother podcast. Maybe we should start a Almost Made It Musicians podcast or something. Oh man. Cool. Cool stuff. Cool stuff. Okay. So, Bluetuskr. Tell us a bit about Bluetuskr, your company, and how you help Amazon brands there.

Andrew Maff:

Yeah. So, we are a full-service digital marketing company for e-commerce sellers. And basically we help in all aspects of digital marketing with e-commerce sellers. That means that they could be solely on Amazon or they could be, which tends to be the case with the people that we work with, they're looking to diversify typically away from Amazon, just because of the constant intricacies and BS of Amazon suspending you because they got bored, basically. And so what we really help do is create an omni-channel experience where we basically help sellers obviously develop their brands off Amazon on their own websites, but also help them get established into other marketplaces like eBay or Walmart or Wayfair, depending obviously on the product line.

Tommy Beringer:

Very cool. Awesome. Awesome. Awesome. Now, I wanted to dive into different traffic methods that you see working best for those Amazon sellers. And I know there's different variables, but overall, what traffic methods do you see working the best currently?

Andrew Maff:

So, it's funny you ask this because I actually just did a video about this earlier this week. So, I got this fresh in my mind.

Tommy Beringer:

Well, send it to me and I'll link it. Cool. I'll link it-

Andrew Maff:

It [crosstalk].

Tommy Beringer:

I'll link it in the podcast, so send it to me.

Andrew Maff:

Yeah, will do. So, all right. So, I'm going to go on a rant here. So, you're on Amazon.

Tommy Beringer:

Go for it. Rant away.

Andrew Maff:

You're on Amazon. You're ready to diversify off Amazon. What's the next step, right? So, basically what I always say is make sure you have your brand registered and create that storefront. And then what you want to do is start driving your display ads to the storefront. That's pretty standard, but the reason you want to do that is just to be able to prove out that you can actually convert from that storefront. From there what I usually suggest to do is either Facebook ads or Google ads, and that's going to be dependent on your product. So, if you think about a product where you have a solution to a problem that people know that exists, right? So, maybe you've created a better water bottle or something like that. That's a horrible example. But let's say you've basically created something that people are actively searching for. Google is going to always have your better conversion rates because these people know what they're looking for and their intent is to find a solution. Whereas-

Tommy Beringer:

So, they're further down the funnel there.

Andrew Maff:

Yeah, exactly. Whereas on Facebook if you are basically presenting a new solution to a problem that people already have, that's when you want to be able... There's a level of education you have to have. So, that's when I would suggest using Facebook. I usually suggest driving traffic directly to the storefront once you've proven that out, because you can leverage that custom source code in the backend, use that code in your Google or in your Facebook ad. So, you can actually track how it's doing and be able to justify like, "Okay, Facebook's working for me. I now know that I can take an off Amazon audience, drive them to Amazon and convert." The best part about doing it on Facebook is that you can narrow down your audience to people that have an interest in Amazon, just in case, even though everyone and their mother uses Amazon, just in case you end up targeting people that don't like shopping on Amazon, you can usually weed them out by narrowing that audience down.

But usually I would start with those two, use that custom source codes so you can prove out like, "Okay, I can actually convert with an off Amazon audience," and then that's where you go, "Okay, what do we want to do next? Do we want to go into other marketplaces?" None of them that I'm aware of have any kind of custom source code, so it makes it difficult to drive off marketplace traffic. So, usually that's when I suggest that's when you're going to start going into your website and things like that. But if you're talking about off Amazon traffic, that is typically the route that I take it.

Tommy Beringer:

Very cool. And then something else I wanted to ask you about is they're starting to reward you for sending outside traffic, Amazon that is, and I forgot the exact name of the program and I'm sure you know what it is, but they're rewarding you by reducing some of your fulfillment fees, I believe. Is that tracked by that same source code?

Andrew Maff:

It's tracked by something different. So, basically what happened there was Amazon had that affiliate program. They've had it for forever where you can basically just sign up and become an affiliate. You don't have to really be anyone. You could just do it. And then you would get a commission for every product that was purchased through your affiliate code. Well, a lot of sellers caught on to that and because they wanted to stay on Amazon, they would drive off Amazon traffic through the affiliate code because they knew if they got a sale, then it would obviously be reflected in the affiliate code and they would get to recoup some of the money that FBA was stealing from them.

Tommy Beringer:

They're double-dipping, right?

Andrew Maff:

Exactly. So, Amazon caught onto it. And for a while there, they were doing what they could to stop that from happening. But in my opinion, Amazon basically figured out, "We're not going to win this battle and they're going to do it anyway, but why do we hate it? Because they're driving traffic off of our website and driving it back to our site. So, why don't we encourage them to keep doing this?" So, they put a different plan together specifically for sellers where they can now do this. I still don't personally love it because you still aren't owning any of the customer data. So, you're still losing all that, which is obviously a different conversation. But that is definitely another way to go. Sometimes the struggle is you have to go directly to one product. So, if you only have one product, it's probably nice to be able to do it that way. But if you have a larger product line, I usually still suggest sending them to the storefront just so that they can see everything that you have to offer.

Tommy Beringer:

Yeah, definitely. And that helps create more of a brand awareness and brand presence, I think, when you run those display ads to the storefront. Which is, I think, the first strategy you said. When you dig into the brand you're doing a little bit of a brand audit, I would assume, when a brand comes on. What if it's a smaller brand? Would it still make sense to drive those display ads to the storefront?

Andrew Maff:

So, by a smaller brand, do you mean maybe they only have one or two products?

Tommy Beringer:

Yeah. Maybe one to five products or so, something like that.

Andrew Maff:

I mean, if you have three or more, you can fill in all those extra holes on the display ads. I think if you have less, you can still do it, too. I don't think there's a limitation on it. To be honest, it's been a while since I've done one with less than three products in it. But even if you're that small, I would still do it. The other reason that I suggest doing it is because when you send people to your storefront, there's no ads on your storefront. There's no competition. When you send them to a listing, you have all those different "frequently bought together" that may not be you or sponsored products or "other people viewed." There's so many things that can really deter someone from shopping on your specific product, that if you keep them on your storefront, and even some of those options give you the option for someone to just buy it right off the storefront without having to go to the listing. So, if you can do it that way it's even better, because you're keeping the competition out of the way.

Tommy Beringer:

Yeah. Just keeping them there and then less of a chance to lose a conversion, right?

Andrew Maff:

Yeah.

Tommy Beringer:

So, just drive them right there. Yeah.

Andrew Maff:

Yeah, exactly.

Tommy Beringer:

Definitely makes sense. Cool. So, I mean, speaking of display ads, what other types of ads within Amazon do you see working the best? And I know it always depends on a lot of things, but overall, what do you see working best for, I guess, a semi-established brand, I would say?

Andrew Maff:

Sponsored products. I mean-

Tommy Beringer:

Sponsored products.

Andrew Maff:

Yeah. Live and die by the original.

Tommy Beringer:

Yeah, right?

Andrew Maff:

It's just it's so easy to really hone in on exactly what's working and then just separate it out and jack that bit up and basically own a spot. I mean, honestly, it makes it so much easier that way. The product display ads can work really well, especially on... A lot of people use them for offense. They'll go and run ads on a competitor's listing. I actually really like separating out the campaigns and doing a little bit of defense too, where you run ads on your own stuff so that you can keep the competitors out. So, every now and then I'll see that work pretty well. I'm a little disappointed with the DSP ads, the off Amazon stuff that runs back to Amazon.

I get that they're retargeting and they're also giving you the option to hit new audiences and stuff. But the problem with that that I've always found is, you can't negate anyone that ended up purchasing a competitor. So, you could end up running retargeting ads to someone that already purchased someone else and you're just wasting your time. So, I'm not a huge fan of them. I rarely see that much benefit from them unless you have a massive product line and you have the budget to just say, "Screw it. I want brand awareness all day long," in which case then they're fine. But otherwise those are probably the ones I would go the other way with and say, "Not a big fan."

Tommy Beringer:

Got ya. And for one of my products, it actually has been working fairly well. It's not my number one ad that I'm running that's getting me the most traffic, but it is giving me a few sales here and there and the A cost is really low.

Andrew Maff:

There you go.

Tommy Beringer:

And it's a very niche product, so maybe that's why. I don't know. But some of my other products it's not working as well, but I just keep running. Of course, if it's working, if it's not broken, don't fix it, right?

Andrew Maff:

Yeah, exactly.

Tommy Beringer:

Just keep it. Let it run, let it run, let it run. As soon as you see something go crazy, then of course you got to adjust those bids or add some more negative keywords or products or whatever.

Andrew Maff:

Yeah.

Tommy Beringer:

Cool, cool. So, I want to know, how are you creating holistic brand presence for these Amazon sellers, these Amazon brands?

Andrew Maff:

I'd hate to-

Tommy Beringer:

I know that's a broad question.

Andrew Maff:

I mean, it is, but it's really not. To be honest, I'd hate to say that what we do here is easy, but it's kind of easy. Basically if you're just an Amazon seller, you're a different breed of person usually. But they work so hard on just small, little, like, "I want to see like a 0.5% increase on this and that." And with the amount of effort that they put into that when you could be focusing on expanding into other areas, a lot of these people that are solely on Amazon, they would kill it off Amazon just because of the way that they run their business. But when it comes to the omni-channel stuff, you've spent so much time putting together this awesome listing. You worked real hard on the copy and focusing on the keywords and you put some great call outs and infographics and stuff like that in your imagery and you built out some great A-plus content and you did all this stuff. And then I see sellers like, "You know what? Let's go try Walmart."

And they just take one crappy product picture, throw it up on the listing, just make a couple bullet points and be like, "Why aren't we getting sales on Walmart?" Well, that's why. It looks nothing like your Amazon account. And then when you think about the brand as a whole, I've seen sellers before where their Amazon sales will actually suffer because of, theoretically, the poor approach that they took to any other marketplace or their own website. So, to give you an example, my wife does not buy anything on Amazon unless she has done a full investigation behind the company. And so she'll go-

Tommy Beringer:

Really?

Andrew Maff:

Yeah. So, she'll-

Tommy Beringer:

I'm totally the opposite. If I see something-

Andrew Maff:

Are you?

Tommy Beringer:

If I see an Instagram ad on something, I'm like, "Okay, that looks cool. I'm going to look for it on Amazon." You know what I mean? It's just like, "Here."

Andrew Maff:

So, she'll-

Tommy Beringer:

Amazon is my go-to.

Andrew Maff:

Yeah. So, she's definitely guilty of that. Too. Or she'll basically see some cool Insta. Every time something arrives at her house, I'm like, "Fucking Instagram." But she'll see something cool on Instagram, but she'll always look into their site and look into their social and see what they're posting and then she'll figure out, "Where can I buy it?" And a lot of times what I've noticed from just watching her shop is basically if she goes to their site and their site is kind of crappy and she doesn't like it, then she's not going to purchase from them. And there's been times where she's found stuff on Amazon that she thought was cool and she'll leave to see like, "Okay, this is sold by so-and-so. Let me see if maybe I can help them and buy on their site." Because she hears me complain all day, so she knows it's better to buy off their site.

But if she goes to their site and it sucks, she's like, "This is sketchy and I don't think I want this product anymore." And it's the same concept as if you're running ads and someone goes to Amazon like you did, then if it looks great, obviously you'll probably purchase. But if you preferred Walmart and you went to Walmart and the listing, looked like crap, you might think it's a knockoff or something. In which case you're like, "Ah, I don't know if I want this." So, you have to have the same level of branding. The amount of effort you put in your Amazon listings and your creative and your copy, you have to put that same amount of effort into everything else that you do. Otherwise, it's going to end up hurting you all around.

Tommy Beringer:

You know what? Yeah, that's very true. And I think it also varies from product to product or from type of brand to type of brand. I think for sure if it's a clothing company, I totally agree. You have to go out there and see the rest of the e-commerce world behind it. You know what I mean? I don't know. If it's, I don't know, maybe a hammer or something. I don't know. I can't think of a product off the top of my head. Maybe not a hammer, but something like that, it's just a little buy, for me personally, I don't need to do all that research, but I totally get that with those other big brands for sure, and those other types of products. Absolutely.

Andrew Maff:

Yeah. I mean, actually the hammer is not a bad example. If you just created another hammer, then yeah, either you have to do something that differentiates you because there's God knows how many hammers in this world. So, at that point, then the question is, you still need to probably go a little over the top on your branding because most hammers don't. Or you need to be very cost-effective, in which case you're just out pricing everyone. And then I don't care what your listing looks like if I need a cheap hammer.

Tommy Beringer:

Yeah. No, exactly, right? And then you got to be careful with that race to the bottom on price, guys. All right?

Andrew Maff:

Well, yeah.

Tommy Beringer:

Always preach that. I mean, Andrew, we could have three other podcast episodes, I think. I might have to bring you on as a regular. We'll see.

Andrew Maff:

I can do that.

Tommy Beringer:

Yeah. Cool man. Cool. Sounds good. So, another thing I wanted to speak to you about, because I know you know your stuff, is influencers. So, I think that more and more brands are starting to utilize them, especially over the past couple of years. What do you see, as far as Amazon private label brands, what do you see the impact of using an influencer for these brand sellers?

Andrew Maff:

Oh, I love them. I think they're great. I think that if you know how to do it correctly without... Because most of the time, depending on, obviously, who you're talking to... If we're talking to a company that's doing hundreds of millions of dollars a year, then yeah, go hire Kim Kardashian and do what you got to do. But if you're under eight figures or you just broke eight figures and you have a budget that you have to work with, then in my opinion on the influencer side, you have all these big companies that you could go to, right? You have GRIN. You have Cohley, where you can essentially have access to all of these relatively known influencers, like people who refer to themselves as influencers. But you'd be shocked at how many people I know that have 10,000 followers, that have great engagement, and they're not bloggers. They're not influencers. They just happen to have a lot of followers.

I have a buddy of mine. He's a good-looking guy. I guess that's why a lot of people follow him, but he's an idiot. No one's following him for the content he's putting out. It's just the pictures that they like, but he's got crazy engagement. And I'm like, "Dude, you don't understand. A brand will just pay you thousands of dollars to post something just for the sake of it." And he's like, "Nah, that's not really what I want to do." But if you took the time as a seller to go find an admin on Upwork that can just scrape people that are in your industry that you think would do well and get their Instagram information, develop a really nice template to DM them and just start conversations with them and build your own community of influencers that you think works...

When you do product launches, what I always suggest to do is, once you've built this list, do a big outreach to all these influencers and say, "Hey," whatever deal you have with them, whether you're sending them free product or you're paying them or both or whatever, figure that stuff out and then say, "Hey, I'm going to send you this new product. I want you to do this with it," and create whatever pictures or video that you need, "and then I want you to all post it at the same time and do it all in one month." So, "Okay, our new product's coming out in June. I want every single influencer to post during the month of June."

So, when you have these issues of, "Okay, I got a new product. How do I get more reviews? How do I start this snowball effect?" It is definitely one hell of a way to get that snowball effect going by just all of a sudden, all the influencers that you follow all have been posting about this one product. It's a great way to kick that snowball effect off.

Tommy Beringer:

Guys, rewind this back. That was straight gold right there. Value bomb right there. Thank you, Andrew. I appreciate that. I mean, it's as simple as going to, like you said, going to Upwork or going to Fiverr, hiring one of these VA's to go ahead and scrape people in your industry amongst some different profiles, get that, try to reach out to them and see if they can post for you. And then another thing I wanted to ask you about is, what do you think about utilizing nano influencers?

Andrew Maff:

I prefer them.

Tommy Beringer:

You prefer them. Okay.

Andrew Maff:

We'll look at follower count. I usually want to have someone... If we're talking about Instagram. TikTok and all that's a different ball game. But if we're talking about Instagram, usually I want them to have about 10,000 followers just so that I know they have the swipe up feature on their story because I'm going to want them to do a story and obviously I want them to have the swipe up option. But outside of that, I don't really focus on follower numbers. I focus on the engagement versus their follower numbers. Because there's so many people out there that have hundreds of thousands of followers and get 15 likes every time they post something, which is immediately obvious that they bought all of them or they bought the account or they somehow scammed their way into... They did one of those follower group things, whatever the hell happened there, that everyone created. That kind of stuff, it never works. So, I always make sure I'm more focused on the quality of the people that are engaging with it than I am how many followers you may have.

Tommy Beringer:

Yeah. That's so important. And one of my guests that I had on, I think it was the episode before this one or a couple episodes before, Willie Lynne, when he started out he was selling these kitchen knives. Or a knife sharpener, excuse me. And then he started going after these nano influencers and this one nano influencer has 1200 subscribers on their YouTube account. And then from the one video they did on his knife sharpener, he got 800 sales. So, the engagement was insane from that, you know?

Andrew Maff:

Yeah.

Tommy Beringer:

So, it's like almost every subscriber pretty much bought something from him, which is nuts.

Andrew Maff:

Yeah. I mean, that's the thing, too, with YouTube that's difficult with YouTube influencers is that you can look at how many subscribers they have, because obviously once they release a video, that person will get a notification. But what you don't know is how many people are just casually looking for that type of video, right? Because then you're looking at more like an SEO side. So, even though that influencer only had 1200 followers or subscribers, he might be getting who knows how many different people viewing the video. As opposed to usually with other social platforms, most of the time they are really only getting eyeballs of their existing followers. But obviously, they got the followers one way or another, so that's not always the case.

Tommy Beringer:

Yeah. Very cool stuff. I mean, Andrew, thank you so much for dropping these value bombs on us. And we like to keep these podcasts short and sweet. I know we could probably keep going on and on and on here, but I like to keep them short and value packed for our listeners. So, we're going to go ahead and wrap this up. And at the end of every show, I'd like our guests to go ahead and give our listeners at least one tip or trick that they can take away after listening to this podcast and implement it inside of their life or inside of their business. So, what do you got for us?

Andrew Maff:

Oh, man. I knew this question was coming and I was not prepared for it. Okay. Oh, I don't think so. Oh, I got one. I got one.

Tommy Beringer:

I believe in you. I believe in you, Andrew.

Andrew Maff:

Okay. So, I've worked with so many businesses at this point and it blows my mind that this is never the case. Get a project management system and treat it like an SOP. So, to give you an example, us internally, we use Asana. They're all kind of the same, so use whatever you want. But we have specific projects for everything that we do, right? So, let's say we're building an Amazon listing. I have a specific project that is for Amazon listings that is a template. So, basically, obviously for us, when we work with someone new, I'll just duplicate that template and I'll have the process ready to go right there so I know exactly what I need to do. But as we learn new things, so as we're attending different conferences, as we're listening to amazing podcasts like this one and we learn some awesome information, I go back into the template and I adjust it based on what I learned so that next time I have to do it, I remember to do it.

It's such common sense to me and it blows my mind that no one does this because you learn new stuff every day. And you're like, "Oh, I want to remember to do that." And then no one ever does it. How many times have you gone to a conference? You're like, "Oh, I got to remember to do that," and then you never do it. But if you have something as simple as it's just one little extra task you got to remember to do next time. Or if you're doing product launches, every time you launch a product, go back and insert what you learned so that next time you do a product launch, you will know exactly how to do it. It streamlines operations. I know we've talked mostly about marketing and stuff, but on an operational side, that crap's a game changer.

Tommy Beringer:

SOPs, guys. That's very important. I mean, just like Andrew was saying, as simple as remembering something, jotting it down or adding it into one of the platforms you use, if you use a larger platform like Asana or something of the sort, but it's important to keep that down, especially for Amazon sellers. Andrew was mentioning your launch process. Your launch process could change. I mean, way back when we all remember when we could buy reviews. That was part of the launch process. So, we had to rip that out of the launch process because you can't buy reviews anymore, right?

Andrew Maff:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Tommy Beringer:

Don't do it. If people reach out to you and say, "You want me to give you some reviews?" don't do it. Trust me, please. Don't do it. But anyways.

Andrew Maff:

[crosstalk].

Tommy Beringer:

Yeah. Right. So, awesome stuff, Andrew. Thank you so much. And if you could let the people out there know, where can they find you? How can they contact you if they want to get ahold of you to utilize your services over at Bluetuskr?

Andrew Maff:

All of our social is @bluetuskr. So, B-L-U-E-T-U-S-K-R. There's no E in Tusker. And then all of my socials @andrewmaff. Just honestly, this is what I do all day. I love just helping and just like, challenge me. Come on. Just tweet me something ridiculous and tell me I can't market it and I will prove you wrong. I don't know how I got so competitive, but do it. Just tweet me. I'll figure it out. Or Facebook or Instagram or whatever else. I don't have a TikTok.

Tommy Beringer:

Love it. Very cool. No TikTok?

Andrew Maff:

I have one to view and I'm still trying to, with certain clients and stuff, we're still trying to figure out what's the best approach to this because it changes every other week, but I don't have one myself that I'm actively using.

Tommy Beringer:

Not yet.

Andrew Maff:

I'm sure I will one day.



Tommy Beringer:

No dances from Andrew @bluetuskr yet, right?

Andrew Maff:

Not yet.

Tommy Beringer:

Not yet. Okay. Got it.

Andrew Maff:

One day.

Tommy Beringer:

We'll notify you guys when that happens. So, Andrew, I just want to thank you so much for coming on. I know you're a super busy guy and thank you for coming on. And I foresee us having some other episodes in the future. I mean, this is some good stuff. You really know your stuff. Thank you for coming on, brother. Much appreciated.

Andrew Maff:

Yeah. Thanks for having me.

Tommy Beringer:

All right.

Andrew Maff:

I would be more than happy to come back.

Tommy Beringer:

Sounds like a plan. Thanks so much. I'll talk to you soon.

Andrew Maff:

Thanks.

Tommy Beringer:

All right. Bye.

All right. Thank you guys so much for listening. And if you got any value out of this podcast at all, please let us know at the place that you listened to it at, whether it be iTunes, Stitcher, whatever it is. Give us some love. Give us an awesome review and let us know maybe some things you want us to talk about on the next podcast. Until next time guys, stay awesome and be awesome.

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